The URI: Bishop Swing's New World Religion 


Contender Ministries

Posted:  July 20, 2002


You’re familiar with the old saying, “The road to hell is paved with good intentions.”  Thanks to the Bishop of the California Diocese of the Episcopal Church, that road is not only paved, but it’s being widened, the lines are painted, and the global religion of the Antichrist is just around the bend.

The United Nations seems a likely tool the Antichrist will use to establish his nefarious one-world government.  The Antichrist’s false prophet could benefit from a global religious entity in establishing the evil world religion.  Mystery Babylon does not have to start from scratch.  The United Religions Initiative (URI) is a global religious body designed to be a “United Nations of religion.”  In fact, in March of 2001, the URI became an official Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) affiliated with the UN.

The brainchild of Bishop William Swing, the URI is now made up of about 170 “Cooperation Circles.”  Each cooperation circle is made up of at least seven members, and represents at least three different religious beliefs.  The URI is lead by the Global Council.  The GC is made up of members elected from the eight geographic regions.  Every two years the URI conducts a conference known as the “General Assembly.”  The next General Assembly will be held August 18-25, 2002 in Rio De Janeiro, Brazil.

According to the preamble of the URI Charter, the URI’s purpose is “to promote enduring daily interfaith cooperation, to end religiously motivated violence and to create cultures of peace, justice and healing for the Earth and all living beings.”  In practice, the URI discourages proselytizing, blurs the line between right and wrong, and demonizes those who did not support its conception – Jews and “fundamentalist” Christians.

There are 21 principles that make up the URI Charter.  In reading the charter, one gets the impression that this body truly exists for a noble cause.  However, three of the principles contain language that could tie the hands and gag the mouths of evangelical Christians.

Principle two states, “We respect the sacred wisdom of each religion, spiritual expression, and indigenous tradition.”  That sounds so nice and tolerant.  Think about this in terms of specifics though.  Could you, as a Christian, say, “I respect the sacred wisdom of Islam, Wicca, Witchcraft, Satanism, Paganism, Buddhism, Druidism, Shamanism, Mormonism, and New Age?”  If you cannot honestly say that, then count yourself out of the URI -- your beliefs are not compatible.

Principle seven states, “We seek and welcome the gift of diversity and model practices that do not discriminate.”  Once again, this principle sounds so nice on the surface.  Unless you are willing to compromise your Biblical beliefs though, you are in trouble.  I believe the Bible is clear that promiscuity, adultery, and homosexuality are three forms of sexual impurity, and all three are sinful.  My position does not conform to the URI model of diversity, as it “discriminates” against homosexuals.  If you believe as I do, then this is strike two against us as far as being URI compatible. 

Finally, principle 21: “Members of the URI shall not be coerced to participate in any ritual or be proselytized.”  I think most of us would agree that there are times when witnessing is just not appropriate.  For example, you would probably not be very effective trying to share the gospel in the middle of a seminar or when appearing in a courtroom.  However, Jesus called us to “make disciples of all the nations.”  Peter tells us to ALWAYS be ready to give a reason for the hope within us.  When a Christian responds to this call, and shares the gospel with someone else, it is called proselytizing.  Principle 21 forbids that practice.  Are you content to keep the reason for your salvation a secret?  If not, you are URI-incompatible. 

The URI, “Mystery Babylon” in infancy, was founded by the Bishop of the California Diocese of the Episcopal Church, Reverend William Swing.  In 1993, Bishop Swing was asked to organize an interfaith service to go along with festivities that marked the fiftieth Anniversary of the United Nations.  Bishop Swing states that he was inspired to do more than merely organize an hour-long prayer service.  He envisioned a body that would foster greater communication among members of various religions.  His goal was to create a “United Nations of Religion” that would parallel the United Nations.  He traveled around the world, meeting with religious leaders in an attempt to create support for his idea.  The two main opponents to his idea were the Catholic leaders in Rome, and “fundamentalist” Christians.  His supporters see Bishop Swing as a visionary.  He is also a globalist, and less than orthodox in his interpretation of the Bible.

The California Diocese of the Episcopal Church is one of – if not THE most liberal diocese in America.  It is very pro-homosexual, and even has a ministry called “Oasis California” that provides for “Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender” involvement in the Episcopal Ministry.  This diocese is very open to blessing homosexual unions, or marriages.  In a letter to Oasis California on the 2001 Convention, Bishop Swing said:

Heterosexuals are a threat to marriage. Homosexual couples are a threat to the traditional institution of family. Homosexuals are kicked out of families and disowned. Then when they form their own families, they are abandoned by the Church. And when they raise their children, society treats them as being scandalously selfish. Nevertheless, we are all going to have to grow up and realize that the institution of family is changing before our eyes. Churches need to have family values -- values for the big, emerging family that has redefined itself.”

Swing’s view of “fundamental” (orthodox) Christianity is a negative one.  He once said, “Fundamentalism...comes about where people feel more and more insecure, and grab harder and harder to the exclusive claims of one religion or another...The sense of the freedom that there must be in God, and the generosity of God, and the compassion of God, gets frozen out with the exclusive claims.”  He makes no secret of the fact that he views religious believers who uphold their faith as a matter of truth, as threats to world peace.  Bishop Swing is such a moral relativist, his moral compass shows “north” in every single direction.  How can he square his beliefs with the words of Jesus in John 14:6, “I am the way and the truth and the life.  No one comes to the Father except through me.”  The answer is that Bishop Swing interprets the Bible only in the manner that fits with his relativist worldview.  This worldview is only too popular today.  Bishop Swing was the recipient of the International Diplomacy Council’s Citizen’s Diplomacy Award.  Congratulatory messages were received from California's Governor Gray Davis and President George W. Bush. In his message, the president not only praised Swing for winning the award, but also saluted the URI for “facilitating international understanding.”

The URI is attracting a great many followers.  As yet, there are no evangelical Christians listed among the membership of the URI.  The reason for this is not hard to figure out.  As Christians, we know that truth does not change, regardless of anyone’s beliefs.  To put Christianity on the same level with Shamanism, Druidism, Hinduism, or Satanism is to deny the words of Christ.  In doing so, we would deny Christ Himself.  Moreover, the URI by all appearances is a perfect avenue to institute the world religion presided over by the Antichrist’s false prophet.  Mystery Babylon may be in her infancy, but she’s here nonetheless.

 

* In a follow-up article, we will examine the URI’s definition of the Christian faith.  In spite of using Christian terminology, the definition itself is quite “New Age,” and I dare say, heretical. 

 

Contender Ministries

http://contenderministries.org